October 21, 2014 - Current Issue
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Bohlen Shares Snarktasitc Tips
CLAS Faculty - Bohlen Shares Snarktasitc Tips

To kick-off the school year, Teague Bohlen, Associate professor of English, shared some of the do's and don'ts for college from his Snarktastic Guide to College Success with the local CW affiliate.

The Snarktastic Guide to College Success
KWGN Daybreak,
Aug 29

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Cobb Compares Ebola Spread to Wildfire
CLAS Faculty - Cobb Compares Ebola Spread to Wildfire

Loren Cobb, Associate Research Professor in Mathematical and Statistical Sciences, explained in this report to the local CBS affiliate how the pattern of Ebola virus spreading in human populations mimics that of wildfires, and how ignoring the disease helps it spread. Cobb explained, "When it hits the densely populated zone, it's completely out of control and goes through the poor suburbs of the city, and then it hits some folks who take airplane travel."

Ebola Virus Advances In Wildfire-Like Pattern, Researchers Say
CBS4
, Aug 7

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Fields Publishes NY Times editorial on Concussion Risks in Youth Sport
CLAS Faculty - Fields Publishes NY Times editorial on Concussion Risks in Youth Sport

Sarah K. Fields, Associate Professor of Communication, had an editorial published on youth soccer, citing a National High School Sports-Related Injury Surveillance Study, arguing that heading isn't the only concern in the area of concussions, but more specifically on-field collisions need to be minimized.

It’s Not Heading, but On-Field Collisions
New York Times
, June 27

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Hartman New Book a Unique Venture
CLAS Faculty - Hartman New Book a Unique Venture

Rudi Hartmann, Associate Professor C/T, Dept of Geography and Environmental Sciences, published jointly with co-editor Jing’ai Wang, Professor at Beijing Normal University, A Comparative Geography of China and the U.S. in the GeoJournal Library of Springer Press this past August. The book, the result of many years of collaboration, is the product of a unique venture. A team of Chinese geographers and American geographers collaborated on a new comparative analysis of the two countries' geographies.

The book meets a high demand for comparative information about China and the United States, the two leading economies in an increasingly interconnected world. Comparisons of the two countries include similarities and differences in their physical environments and natural hazards, the growth and changing spatial distribution of population and ethnic groups, surveys of traditions and contemporary regional expressions of agriculture and food production, as well as the rapidly changing urban and industrial patterns in both countries. The book also highlights the two countries' interconnectedness, in trade and in the many exchanges of cultural, social, scientific & technological information.

Read More... | Archive: Accolades Archive | October 21, 2014 | 15 Views


Hodgkins Newest Anthropology Faculty
CLAS Faculty - Hodgkins Newest Anthropology Faculty

The Anthropology department welcomes Dr. Jamie Hodgkins (Ph.D. 2012 Arizona State University), the newest hire in the field of archaeology. Hodgkins’ research focuses on Neanderthals and Homo sapiens from Europe and southern Africa during the Middle and Upper Paleolithic periods, or about 10,000-200,000 years ago. She is particularly interested in the use of evolutionary theory to develop and test models of Neandertal and early human behavior, particularly in the ways that ancestral (or not so ancestral) species adapted to and exploited different prey animals. Her research therefore incorporates an understanding of animal behavior and how Neandertals and early humans structured their own movements to intercept them.  Her research has implications for the ongoing debates over the similarities and differences between Neanderthals and Homo sapiens. Hodgkins currently works at field sites in Bulgaria and South Africa.

Read More... | Archive: Accolades Archive | October 21, 2014 | 13 Views


Kruger and Mueller Publish on Smoking in Prisons
CLAS Faculty - Kruger and Mueller Publish on Smoking in Prisons

Patrick M. Krueger, Assistant Professor in Health & Behavioral Sciences, and Shane Mueller, PhD student in Health & Behavioral Sciences, co-authored on a paper in the British Medical Journal that examines the association between tobacco control policies in prisons and smoking related deaths in the US. The authors find that smoking attributable mortality per 100,000 population is much higher in prisons than in the non-institutionalized population. Further, policies that restrict tobacco in prisons are associated with reductions in deaths from cancer, cardiovascular diseases, and pulmonary diseases. The article was recently discussed by the Respiratory & Sleep Journal Club, on Twitter, at the University of Toronto.

Read More... | Archive: Accolades Archive | October 21, 2014 | 13 Views


Lin Receives Prestigious Henry Dreyfus Award
CLAS Faculty - Lin Receives Prestigious Henry Dreyfus Award

Hai Lin, Associate Professor of Chemistry, was recently named a Henry Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar for 2014.  Awarded by the Camile and Henry Dreyfus Foundation, the Henry Dreyfus Teacher-Scholar Awards Program supports the research and teaching careers of talented young faculty in the chemical sciences at undergraduate institutions. Based on institutional nominations, the program provides discretionary funding to faculty at an early stage in their careers. The award is based on accomplishment in scholarly research with undergraduates, as well as a compelling commitment to teaching, and provides an unrestricted research grant of $60,000. You can read more about eh award here.

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Reich Research on Vaccination Refusal Focuses on Socioeconomic Status
CLAS Faculty - Reich Research on Vaccination Refusal Focuses on Socioeconomic Status

A new study conducted by Jennifer Reich, Associate Professor of Sociology, shows that the reasons why children may not be fully vaccinated depends on the class privilege of their mothers. “Vaccine-refusers see themselves as experts on their own children and question the relevance of public health claims that vaccines are necessary for all children,” said Reich.  “They trust that ‘mother’s intuition,’ alongside their own personal research, is the best way to protect their children from potential harm.”

Researcher finds income, education disparity in reasons for choosing not to vaccinate
CU Connections,
Sept 4

Better-Educated People More Open to Dubious Health Info on Web: Study
U.S. News and World Report,
Sept 24

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Ren Laboratory Provides Novel Findings that Help Explain the PcG-mediated Epigenetic Memory
CLAS Faculty - Ren Laboratory Provides Novel Findings that Help Explain the PcG-mediated Epigenetic Memory

A multi-disciplinary team from the Department of Chemistry including Xiaojun Ren, Assistant Professor, BS/MS students Chao Yu Zhen and Huy Nguyen Duc, and undergraduate student Marko Kokotovic, and the Department of Integrative Biology's Assistant Professor Christopher Phiel, published the article Cbx2 stably associates with mitotic chromosomes via a PRC2 or PRC1-independent mechanism and is needed for recruiting PRC1 complex to mitotic chromosomes in Molecular Biology of the Cell. The maintenance of the PcG-mediated epigenetic inheritance through many cell generations is essential for cellular differentiation. The molecular mechanisms that regulate this process are enigmatic, and this article will help explain the molecular mechanisms of the PcG-mediated epigenetic inheritance. In the paper, the data point to the importance of the PcG protein Cbx2 for recruiting other members of PcG proteins to mitotic chromosomes, illustrate the marked differences of dynamics of PcG proteins binding to chromatins between interphase and mitosis, and demonstrate the recruitment and maintenance of PcG proteins on mitotic chromosomes are mechanistically uncoupled.

Read More... | Archive: Accolades Archive | October 21, 2014 | 14 Views


Walsh and Romero Troupe Help Soldiers Tell Their Stories
CLAS Faculty - Walsh and Romero Troupe Help Soldiers Tell Their Stories

James Walsh, Senior Instructor in Political Science and recent recipient of the CU Denver Rosa Parks Diversity Award, led the Romero Theater Troupe in their most recent show, Telling: Denver, which premiered August 1-3, at St Cajatans.  Telling: Denver depicts stories of the difficult transition back to “regular life” that many veterans experience.  For the show, six former service men and women took to the stage to enact stories from their own backgrounds. The troupe collaborated with the Veteran Artist Program and the Telling Project to bring this show to Denver, and hopes to have more performances in the future, information can be found at http://romerotroupe.org/.

Veterans Share Their Emotions Onstage In ‘Telling: Denver’
CBS4, July 31: 

Common language: Soldiers, vets, military members find catharsis, drama in retelling their stories
Aurora Sentinel, July 31

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