March 14, 2017 - Current Issue
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Three-Dimensional Parking, Two Careers, One Exceptional Alum
Alumni Profile - Three-Dimensional Parking, Two Careers, One Exceptional Alum

Parking is a puzzle that Phil Harding loves to solve. It takes a certain type of mind to look at the tons of metal (and other materials) that make up modern cars and think about how to stack them one on top of the other. Phil Harding honed his mind earning his Chemistry degree from CU Denver, and he says, "Chemistry taught me to think about problems differently. For most people parking is a two-dimensional problem, for my company it's in three dimensions."

After receiving his Chemistry BS in 1986 Harding was accepted to both medical school at Creighton University and law school at the University of Denver. His plan was to do a JD/MD, starting with the law degree, but during his first year at DU he began working for his father's company, Harding Steel.

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Alum Builds Company on Personal and Brand Loyalty
Alumni Profile - Alum Builds Company on Personal and Brand Loyalty

"I'm here to help people," Matt Kaspari's inner voice has been telling him that for a long time. It's an instinct many people can relate to, the desire to be of service. But the translation of this urge into a career path can be tricky. It takes a born entrepreneur to find a way to create something brand new that satisfies the itch.

Being true to yourself is a complicated art to master. Kaspari developed this type of loyalty while earning his BS in Mathematical and Statistical Science in 2005, and followed up with a MS in Applied Mathematics in 2010. Coming from five generations of engineers he could easily have worked to fit himself into that mold, but he says he knew from the start engineering wasn't for him. When it came time to get his education Kaspari struck out on his own.

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Study Shows Sudden Debt Causes Spike in Mortality Rates
Frontlines - Study Shows Sudden Debt Causes Spike in Mortality Rates

While disagreements about how to pay for healthcare in America and simultaneously build a strong economy play out in the media, two CLAS researchers are discovering ties between financial health and physical well-being. In order to better understand how macro-scale economic factors can impact micro-scale human health and mortality, Associate Dean and Economics Professor Laura Argys and Economics Assistant Professor Andrew Friedson dove into financial data.

Argys and Friedson's new study (in collaboration with Federal Reserve Economist M. Melinda Pitts) shows a direct link between individual financial strain and increased risk of death, a finding with potentially major implications for both economic and health care policy. Argys, Friedson and Pitts found that bad credit and severely delinquent debt lead to higher individual mortality risks. The study, was released recently as a working paper by the Federal Reserve Bank of Atlanta.

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